Dogs make gestures not only because they are excited but to communicate with humans

 
Related

Man who murdered over 70 serial killers, now walks free

You have to know
298 points

Here s why you should never, ever drain your pasta in the sink

You have to know
250 points



Most recent

Una vida gris

Enrique TF
12 points

Leonor, Rosa la panadera y Pere el eterno enamorado

Enrique TF
8 points

El impacto de las redes sociales en el lenguaje

Mis Noticia
342 points

Oración de la noche para agradecer a Dios

Oraciones
10 points

Unos enmascarados secuestran en Minsk a la única líder opositora que quedaba en Bielorrusia

Henri Monzó Catalá
8 points

Maratón de poesía lorquiana

Guillermo Pilía
382 points

QUÉ SIGUE AHORA EN EL PROCESO DE ÁLVARO URIBE VÉLEZ?

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
78 points

Foro HyperX: Hablemos de Gaming en el Día del Gamer

Juan C
12 points

De líderes hablando..., un poco

Camino y perspectiva
10 points

COVID-19: Frenazo a los plazos de la vacuna de AstraZeneca y Oxford

Henri Monzó Catalá
68 points
SHARE
TWEET
If you have ever had a dog, you probably know how much it moves us when we get home, whether we have been away for 5 minutes or 5 hours, our furry friend awaits us with excitement and joy, protects us from problems and makes faces of "give me my part, human!" every time we bring something to our mouth.

Dogs make gestures not only because they are excited but to communicate with humans

If your beloved pet often wags, jumps and gets excited when you get home, perhaps not only does it out of emotion but is communicating with you.

A recent study by the University of Portsmouth (UK) revealed that dogs produce more facial expressions when humans observe them. Scientists at the University's Dog Cognition Center were the first to discover clear evidence that dogs move their faces in direct response to human attention.

These scientists found that dogs do not respond with more facial expressions when they see tasty snacks, suggesting that these animals produce facial expressions to communicate and not just because they are excited.

"Domestic dogs are an interesting model for this type of study as they have a unique history: they have lived with humans for about 30,000 years, during which selection pressures appear to have acted upon their ability to communicate with humans" , scientists note in the work published today in the journal Scientific Reports.

Cognitive expert Juliane Kaminski led the study, where the researchers studied 24 dogs of various races, one to twelve years old.

Fuente: www.adn40.mx
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content