Hyperactive brain networks can multiply fibromyalgia pain: Study

 
Related

Man who murdered over 70 serial killers, now walks free

You have to know
420 points

Here s why you should always wear socks when you go to bed

You have to know
258 points



Most recent

Fernando Simón explica por qué se dispararán los contagios de Covid este verano

NOTICIAS-ETF
60 points

LAS BOTAS ALTAS DE CAUCHO SON EL PEOR ENEMIGO DE LOS CAMPESINOS

Image Press
12 points

Hallan en la Antártida superbacterias capaces de generar nuevas enfermedades

NOTICIAS-ETF
22 points

DistroTV eleva su oferta de canales a más de 270

Comms1
14 points

Modelos de Cat phones acumulan 49 premios en 10 años

Comms1
32 points

Johnson Controls fortalece la seguridad del sector bancario en América Latina

TECH2022
44 points

Hablamos de COVID-19 y sus variantes: El riesgo de muerte se triplica en los pacientes no vacunados

NOTICIAS-ETF
136 points

Colombianos diversifican inversiones, ante escenarios económicos y sociopolíticos adversos

Image Press
40 points

Simplemente Gracias, la nueva apuesta de LOS TRI-O por la música romántica

TECH2022
26 points

Un virólogo del CSIC vaticina cada cuánto tiempo habrá que vacunarse contra el Covid-19

NOTICIAS-ETF
234 points
SHARE
TWEET
A new study reveals evidence that fibromyalgia patients have hypersensitive brain networks that multiply pain.

Hyperactive brain networks can multiply fibromyalgia pain: Study

Researchers at the University of Michigan and South Korea's Pohang University of Science and Technology reported evidence of a phenomenon called explosive synchronization in fibromyalgia patients.

The chronic condition is characterized by widespread pain and a heightened response to pain, and the new study, published this week in Scientific Reports, suggests the associated pain may be magnified by the brain.

"For the first time, this research shows that the hypersensitivity experienced by chronic pain patients may result from hypersensitive brain networks," Dr. Richard Harris, an associate professor of anesthesiology at the University of Michigan, said in a press release. "The subjects had conditions similar to other networks that undergo explosive synchronization."

Researchers studied electrical brain activity in 10 patients with fibromyalgia. Baseline electroencephalograph readings showed hypersensitive brain networks and a correlation between explosive synchronization conditions and self-reported levels of pain.

The researchers used computer modeling to compare stimulus responses of the fibromyalgia patients to normal responses, and learned that the fibromyalgia model was more sensitive than the model lacking explosive synchronizations.

The results of the study could lead to testing for brain regions that could transform a hypertensive network into a more stable one, Harris said.

Fuente: www.upi.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content