Bizarre "Sea Monster" Washes Up In Australia

 
Related

An Upside Down Wine Glass To Confuse Your Friends

Viral things
624 points

Kate Winslet Finally Admits That Rose Could Have Saved Jack's Life In "Titanic"

Viral things
800 points



Most recent

Así son los hospitalizados Ómicron: sin vacunar, más jóvenes, más mujeres y menos riesgo UCI

NOTICIAS-ETF
12 points

Cómo planear viajes auténticos

Rasaca
10 points

¿Cómo estás? ... no me contestó

El diario de Enrique
12 points

¿Qué es el IMC?: El sobrepeso y la obesidad se miden utilizando el índice de masa corporal (IMC).

NOTICIAS-ETF
10 points

Un nuevo análisis de sangre detecta cáncer en personas con síntomas que suelen pasar desapercibidos

NOTICIAS-ETF
322 points

Así es la vacuna contra la Covid-19 que anuncia Japón que daría inmunidad "de por vida"

NOTICIAS-ETF
8 points

Cloruro de magnesio para la cistitis: Una gran ayuda para luchar contra las infecciones

NOTICIAS-ETF
10 points

Marcas y modelos de bicicletas más vendidos

Rasaca
6 points

Habrá consecuencias graves: El cambio climático acelera la desaparición d los glaciares del Himalaya

NOTICIAS-ETF
308 points

Mueren por covid-19, con 6 días de diferencia, 2 famosos gemelos d TV francesa q estaban sin vacunar

NOTICIAS-ETF
12 points
SHARE
TWEET
The Loch Ness Monster has got nothing on this. A creature – which looks like a mash-up of a dolphin, a crocodile, and an eel – has washed up in Australia.

Bizarre "Sea Monster" Washes Up In Australia

Local fisherman Robert Tyndall took a photograph of the sea beast after finding it poking out onto a boat ramp in Swansea, New South Wales.

Since being uploaded to Facebook by Ethan Tippa, the image has divided opinion. Some have suspected that the image is photoshopped, with others speculating it’s a “prehistoric” sea monster. Many have suggested that the animal is actually a species of deep-sea shark or eel.

Marine biologist Dr. Julian Pepperell has said that the specimen is almost certainly a pike eel (Muraenesox bagio). The species is found throughout the Indo-Pacific Ocean and has often been reported in the coastal waters of New South Wales, eastern Australia.

He told the Newcastle Herald: “I think it's definitely a pike eel. The head is very indicative of that species.”

Although pike eels can grow up to 1.8 meters (5.9 feet), Dr. Pepperell added: “It's hard from the photo to get an idea of the scale.”

Fuente: www.iflscience.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content