Researchers Are Pretty Sure They've Found A New Planet In Our Solar System

34.38% credibility
 
Related

6-Year-Old Boy Treats His Mom to a 'Dinner Date' Once a Month With His Allowance Money

Four
2164 points

Restricted meal times might not be the best idea for dieters, study suggests

Four
1518 points



Most recent

Most beautiful cities in Andalusia

Turismo Costa del So
38 points

Are Blood Clot Risks in Your Genes?

Healthy Life
446 points

Eye-catching NuBike goes with drive levers instead of a chain

Health at home
242 points

Paella, the Best Way to Enjoy a Gastronomic Tour of Valencia

About everything
54 points

9 Ways HIV Is Not Spread

Healthy Life
256 points

Weather and Mood: Rainy With a Chance of Depression

Everything
326 points
SHARE
TWEET
Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown, two CalTech scientists, say the new planet is about 10 times the mass of Earth and has an atmosphere of hydrogen and helium. Science magazine reports that the mysterious "Planet X" moves in a distant orbit beyond Neptune.



Researchers Are Pretty Sure They've Found A New Planet In Our Solar System

The researchers haven't observed Planet X itself, but believe it exists because of the unique configuration of six objects when they come closest to the sun, according to Science.

The scientists say that there's a 0.007 percent probability that the configuration is due to chance, and instead are confident it's a ninth planet. They believe they will observe the planet with a telescope within five years, according to The Associated Press.

So where did this possible planet come from? Scientists have previously speculated that there could be a missing planet in our solar system, with some theorizing that a collision caused it to be ejected out of our system some 4 billion years ago. That collision may have been with Jupiter.

"Although we were initially quite skeptical that this planet could exist, as we continued to investigate its orbit and what it would mean for the outer solar system, we become increasingly convinced that it is out there," Batygin said in a statement. "There is solid evidence that the solar system's planetary census is incomplete."

Batygin and Brown described their findings in The Astronomical Journal on Wednesday.

The discovery is also the second time that Brown has reshaped the way we think about the solar system. In 2005, he made a key discovery that led scientists to reclassify Pluto as a dwarf planet. In a statement on Wednesday, Brown -- whose Twitter handle is @plutokiller -- alluded to the role he played in getting Pluto declassified, noting that the new discovery was 5,000 times the mass of Pluto and was definitely a planet.

"All those people who are mad that Pluto is no longer a planet can be thrilled to know that there is a real planet out there still to be found," he said.

Fuente: www.huffingtonpost.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content