At least 2 in 10 American children live in poverty

27.27% credibility
 
Related

92 Percent of Students Prefer Paper Books Over E-Books

Atma
940 points

Adorable Japanese Hamster Eating A Carrot Before Sleeping Is Taking Over The Internet

Atma
2508 points



Most recent

"Un tanguito" de Carla Pugliese, tiene letra.

Nuevas canciones
40 points

CORONAVIRUS: "Esta epidemia desaparecerá hacia junio y no volveremos a ver algo así en una década"

Henri Monzó Catalá
108 points

¿Por qué requiere tanto tiempo conseguir una vacuna contra el coronavirus?

Actualidad
388 points

Las Colombianas, el Yoga, el patatús de Antoñito y Vivir es lo primero

Henri Monzó Catalá
24 points

La educación digital es para los pobres y los estúpidos

Enrique TF
38 points

En tiempos de Pandemia: Al pueblo, pan y circo, (S+S).

Enrique TF
16 points

La cola de las verduras y la edad terciaria

Enrique TF
14 points

La gran hez de la política patria

Henri Monzó Catalá
20 points

Qué desierto debemos atravesar?

Henri Monzó Catalá
14 points

Estados alterados... ¡Bah!

Juan Cantalatabla
12 points
SHARE
TWEET
A new report says the number of American children living in poverty is dropping — but it's still higher than before the Great Recession.

At least 2 in 10 American children live in poverty

Twenty-two percent of American children were living in poverty in 2013, according to data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a Baltimore-based child advocacy group. That's a one-point drop from the previous year, but still higher than 2008, when the share of children living in poverty sat at 18%.

That number climbed to 23% in 2012, where it maxed out before beginning to dip in 2013.

Children in the South and Southwest were the worst off, with 34% — or 1 in 3 — of Mississippi children living in poverty. New Hampshire had the lowest level of child poverty with just 10%.

The foundation's numbers back up trends from an earlier study this month, from the Pew Research Center, that analyzed Census data and found poverty rates were especially high for African-American children.

That study found that while poverty rates fell for Hispanic, white and Asian children, the figures had not changed for black children — 38.3% of whom lived in poverty in 2013. That's nearly four times the rate of white children.

Fuente: mashable.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content