At least 2 in 10 American children live in poverty

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A new report says the number of American children living in poverty is dropping — but it's still higher than before the Great Recession.

At least 2 in 10 American children live in poverty

Twenty-two percent of American children were living in poverty in 2013, according to data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a Baltimore-based child advocacy group. That's a one-point drop from the previous year, but still higher than 2008, when the share of children living in poverty sat at 18%.

That number climbed to 23% in 2012, where it maxed out before beginning to dip in 2013.

Children in the South and Southwest were the worst off, with 34% — or 1 in 3 — of Mississippi children living in poverty. New Hampshire had the lowest level of child poverty with just 10%.

The foundation's numbers back up trends from an earlier study this month, from the Pew Research Center, that analyzed Census data and found poverty rates were especially high for African-American children.

That study found that while poverty rates fell for Hispanic, white and Asian children, the figures had not changed for black children — 38.3% of whom lived in poverty in 2013. That's nearly four times the rate of white children.

Fuente: mashable.com
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