Good-looking men are less likely to succeed in job interviews because they re seen as a threat

 
Related

Retired teacher returns to teach for free

Lots of things
626 points

The FBI Now Considers Animal Abuse a Class A Felony

Lots of things
1266 points



Most recent

5 sectores que se están recuperando rápidamente tras la pandemia

Mis Noticia
100 points

La vital importancia de la tercera dosis o de refuerzo, de la vacuna anticovid-19

NOTICIAS-ETF
150 points

5 Consejos para fortalecer el sistema inmunológico rápidamente (comprobados científicamente)

NOTICIAS-ETF
106 points

Mejor morir que vivir muerto ... ¿Una opción válida?

El diario de Enrique
8 points

SALTO CUANTICO EN POLITICA

pensamiento Libre
76 points

Maradona: las 6 enfermedades que más problemas le dieron al pibe de oro

NOTICIAS-ETF
96 points

Una noche en casa ajena, grupo ajeno, tertulia ajena

El diario de Enrique
6 points

UNICEF: A diferencia d sus mayores, los jóvenes creen q el mundo se va convirtiendo en mejor lugar

NOTICIAS-ETF
68 points

Tips para triunfar con una tienda online para expertos de un sector

Mis Noticia
10 points

Cómo bajar el colesterol sin medicamentos con este simple consejo revelado por Harvard

NOTICIAS-ETF
198 points
SHARE
TWEET
Struggling to find a job? Devilishly attractive? Well the two may be linked.

Good-looking men are less likely to succeed in job interviews because they   re seen as a threat

That’s according to a new study from the University of Maryland, where researchers discovered that male attractiveness can be a disadvantage when it comes to job interviews.

According to assistant professor Marko Pitesa, handsome men intimidate employers, who see them as a potential threat.

The research team did find, however, that if the interviewer was told he would be working alongside the interviewee – rather than have the interviewee working for him – attractive men were favoured.

241 adults were asked to evaluate fictional job candidates based on fake qualifications and experience with men assessing men and women assessing women.

Fictional candidates came with computer-generated headshots that were either attractive or unattractive.

A second experiment involved 92 people, who were asked to evaluate competitors or partners in a quiz game. Again, headshots ranging in attractiveness were used and the same pattern of discrimination was seen.

In another test, women judged men and men judged women, and in a final experiment, actual student candidates were used. In both cases, people opted to work with attractive men but compete against unattractive men.

‘The way we explain it here, pretty men just seem more competent, so it is actually subjectively rational to discriminate for or against them,’ Pitesa said.

Fuente: metro.co.uk
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content