More intelligent people are more likely to binge drink and get drunk

 
Related

Which banana would you choose? Your response may affect your health

Crazy stuff
346 points

Can you spot the animal in the picture?

Crazy stuff
442 points



Most recent

Ride the fury road, the Mark Cavendish's story

About everything
34 points

'Consistency was the key to losing over 55 kilos'

Health at home
18 points

How this 22-year-old went from chubby student to gym beast

About everything
22 points

'I tried cryotherapy and this is what happened'

Health at home
32 points

The pros and cons of 4 sleeping positions

Health at home
32 points

Latest research reveals the more you hug your kids, the smarter they get

You have to know
24 points

7 simple lessons that helped me finally get serious about losing weight

Health at home
38 points

Mom s heartbreaking choice for her daughter: blindness or unbearable pain?

Health at home
34 points

Doctors issue warning over contagious illness that affects children spreading in Virginia

You have to know
34 points

Cancer survivor receives new tongue made from her leg, and the first thing she eats is KFC

Health at home
18 points
SHARE
TWEET
Not only are more intelligent individuals more likely to consume more alcohol more frequently, they are more likely to engage in binge drinking and to get drunk.

More intelligent people are more likely to binge drink and get drunk

In an earlier post, I show that, consistent with the prediction of the Hypothesis, more intelligent individuals consume larger quantities of alcohol more frequently than less intelligent individuals. The data presented in the post come from the National Child Development Study in the United Kingdom. The NCDS measures the respondents’ general intelligence before the age of 16, and then tracks the quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption throughout their adulthood in their 20s, 30s, and 40s.

The graph presented in the post show a clear monotonic association between childhood general intelligence and both the frequency and the quantity of adult alcohol consumption. The more intelligent they are in childhood, the more and the more frequently they consume alcohol in their adulthood.

There are occasional medical reports and scientific studies which tout the health benefits of mild alcohol consumption, such as drinking a glass of red wine with dinner every night. So it may be tempting to conclude that more intelligent individuals are more likely to engage in such mild alcohol consumption than less intelligent individuals, and the positive association between childhood general intelligence and adult alcohol consumption reflects such mild, and thus healthy and beneficial, alcohol consumption.

Unfortunately for the intelligent individuals, this is not the case. More intelligent children are more likely to grow up to engage in binge drinking (consuming five or more units of alcohol in one sitting) and getting drunk.

The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) asks its respondents specific questions about binge drinking and getting drunk. For binge drinking, Add Health asks: “During the past 12 months, on how many days did you drink five or more drinks in a row?” For getting drunk, it asks: “During the past 12 months, on how many days have you been drunk or very high on alcohol?” For both questions, the respondents can answer on a six-point ordinal scale: 0 = none, 1 = 1 or 2 days in the past 12 months, 2 = once a month or less (3 to 12 times in the past 12 months), 3 = 2 or 3 days a month, 4 = 1 or 2 days a week, 5 = 3 to 5 days a week, 6 = every day or almost every day.

As you can see in the graph, there is a clear monotonic positive association between childhood intelligence and adult frequency of binge drinking. “Very dull” Add Health respondents (with childhood IQ < 75) engage in binge drinking less than once a year. In sharp contrast, “very bright” Add Health respondents (with childhood IQ > 125) engage in binge drinking roughly once every other month.

Fuente: www.psychologytoday.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content