The vast divide between America and its military

 
Related

12 foods that help your liver detox your body

About everything
266 points

5 key reasons why parenting is in crisis right now

About everything
572 points



Most recent

oxoHotel revela la evolución de su marca y los planes estratégicos de su crecimiento

Comunicaciones
12 points

La vacuna contra algunos tipos de cáncer, cada vez más cerca

NOTICIAS-ETF
44 points

Courtyard by Marriott ofrece experiencia única en Bogotá Fashion Week

Comunicaciones
12 points

Amanecer

El diario de Enrique
8 points

Courtyard by Marriott Bogotá Airport presenta su campaña especial para el Día de la Madre

Comunicaciones
8 points

¿Qué fue de Jaime Alguersuari tras su salida de la F1?

MaríaGeek
8 points

Mamá: Abrázame que aún te extraño

El diario de Enrique
10 points

Carreras emocionantes y mucho agarre en la Hankook iON Race

Viajes y turismo
10 points

El tiempo

El diario de Enrique
8 points

Plástico degradable que se autodestruye al final de su vida útil

NOTICIAS-ETF
20 points
SHARE
TWEET
The Pentagon says a U.S. Marine was killed yesterday by an ISIS rocket in northern Iraq. The attack occurred on the eve of an anniversary that many people might overlook . . . but which Iraq War veteran Matt Gallagher has not:

The vast divide between America and its military

Thirteen years ago, the American military invaded Iraq.

Something for the history books? Not yet. Everything happening in that region -- from ISIS to airstrikes to Delta Force raids -- is connected to that decision, and the subsequent nine years of war and occupation.

According to recent polls, more than half of Americans support a ground invasion against the Islamic State. The same number would bar Syrian refugees from entering the U.S. That a ground war against ISIS would lead to substantially more refugees doesn't seem to matter -- and that such an invasion would ethically and legally be followed by a lengthy occupation also seems inconsequential, somehow.

Another recent poll revealed that 60 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds (military-age Millennials) support American combat operations against ISIS; nearly the same percentage would never join the fight, though, even if they were needed.

For too many Americans in 2016, war isn't a dire act turned to once all other options have been exhausted. It's a narcotic, a quick fix, something that happens in strange, faraway lands, where other people's sons and daughters do violent things for country.

As an Iraq veteran who spent a formative time in dusty, sectarian towns north of Baghdad, I've long wondered if America pays attention to its foreign affairs. These ugly contradictions and paradoxes don't help with that.

Which brings me to the presidential primaries.

We're a republic; citizens can support whomever they choose. But when legitimate candidates running for commander-in-chief suggest war crimes should be allowed, or that carpet-bombing makes for sound military strategy, I find myself wanting to find the supporters of these candidates and ask: "What if your son or daughter were given those missions? Would you still cheer?"

In the era of the all-volunteer force, service-members are abstractions and ciphers to many on the home front. It's easier to send abstractions and ciphers to war, and keep them there, than it is to send people we know, kids we've watched grow.

The divide between America and its military is vast. This should disturb us all, soldier and citizen. Republics don't behave like this.

Everything the military does abroad happens in our name. They don't just wear the patch of their unit; they also wear the patch of the American flag. They represent us all. It's well past time we remember that, and do right by them the way they've sworn to do right by us.

Thirteen years after Iraq, it's the least we can do.

Fuente: www.cbsnews.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!

Comentarios más recientes
Stefani V. Sahuquillo J.
Interesting!! Thanks for the information
 
Featured content