One chart explains why Syrian refugees aren't dangerous

 
Related

Loyal Dog Jumps on Hospital Bed to Comfort 9-Year-Old Boy With Autism

Puyol Mos
902 points

Actor Alan Rickman, Snape in "Harry Potter" films, dies at 69

Puyol Mos
1218 points



Most recent

África González, inmunóloga: «Es muy probable que el catarro común haya protegido frente al coronav

Henri Monzó Catalá
28 points

Boletin de Noticias

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
26 points

Éramos felices y no lo sabíamos

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
26 points

Colombiana gana concurso de canto en Dubái

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
116 points

Boletin de Noticias

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
26 points

Más de $24.000 millones ha aportado el sector minero en Antioquia para apoyar a las comunidades más

Image Press
14 points

Las brasas del poder efímero

Henri Monzó Catalá
26 points

Boletin de Noticias

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
16 points

La gran hez de la política patria

Henri Monzó Catalá
20 points

APELACION DE SENTENCIAS DE AFORADOS ABSOLUTORIAS EN ÚNICA INSTANCIA

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
26 points
SHARE
TWEET
The above chart is not a misprint.

One chart explains why Syrian refugees aren't dangerous

It’s an accurate graphical representation of the number of refugees resettled in the United States since September 11, 2001 who have been arrested on domestic terrorism charges:

Zero. Zilch. Nada.

Over the last three days, as the world has reeled from the terrorist attacks in Paris, many U.S. politicians have called for measures to prevent Syrian refugees from being given asylum in America. More than twenty governors have refused to allow Syrian refugees in their state, their stated rationale being that refugees are more likely to harbor extremist tendencies than legal immigrants or natural-born citizens, or that violent extremists will pose as refugees in order to gain entry to the U.S.


“As your Governor, I will not stand complicit to a policy that places the citizens of Alabama in harm’s way,” said Alabama governor Robert Bentley, one of the many governors to give such statements on Monday.

But the data shows that fears about refugees carrying out terrorist attacks are gravely misplaced. As The Economist reports, of the nearly 750,000 refugees who have taken up residence in the U.S. since 9/11, none have been arrested on charges of domestic terrorism. According to the Migration Policy Institute, only three refugees in the U.S.—a pair of Iraqi refugees in Kentucky who were charged with assisting al-Qaeda in Iraq, and an Uzbek refugee with ties to an Islamist organization in Uzbekistan—have been arrested on any kind of terrorism charge.

In fact, the data show that most violent extremists in the U.S. are actually natural-born citizens. And the U.S. already takes extreme precaution when screening refugees for settlement. As the Migration Policy Institute puts it:

[The] refugee resettlement program is the least likely avenue for a terrorist to choose. Refugees who are selected for resettlement to the United States go through a painstaking, many-layered review before they are accepted. The FBI, Department of Homeland Security, State Department, and national intelligence agencies independently check refugees’ biometric data against security databases. The whole process typically takes 18-24 months, with high hurdles for security clearance.

American opposition to allowing Syrian refugees in the U.S. also ignores the fact that most Syrian refugees are trying to escape the kind of violence that ISIS’s rise has enabled. These aren’t extremist sympathizers—they’re people who have been driven from their country by extremists.

Despite state opposition, the U.S. still plans to accept approximately 10,000 Syrian refugees over the next fiscal year. So if your governor, or another elected official in your state needs a reminder of why accepting Syrian refugees isn’t an invitation to terrorism—but rather a humanitarian gesture to citizens of a country that has been torn apart by extremist violence—you can feel free to send them the chart above.

Fuente: fusion.net
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content