Parents get their six year old son plastic surgery after bullies tease him

47.06% credibility
 
Related

Japan s Cat Island Asks Internet For Food, Gets More Than They Can Store

Stuff
478 points

The schoolboy, 16, who will live with a Russian porn star in a hotel for a month

Stuff
3496 points



Most recent

Consejos y guía para comprar auriculares correctamente

Mis Noticia
10 points

Revisión crítica del tema agropecuario y ambienta

PENSAMIENTO LIBRE
20 points

IMUES EL VERDE SE HA TORNADO ROJIZO

Carlos Eduardo Lagos Campos
30 points

Panameño recibe nombramiento en organización de prestigio mundial

Technews
10 points

TIEMPO PARA VIVIR

Logia Stgo. de Chile
12 points

GRAN COLOMBIA GOLD ANUNCIA RESULTADOS DE PERFORACIÓN DE ALTO TENOR DE LOS PROGRAMAS DE PERFORACIÓN D

Image Press
6 points

Cómo montar un restaurante post COVID-19

Saludables
294 points

Mascarilla peel off carbon, el mejor secreto de belleza

Familia sana
12 points

Dos días a la deriva

Enrique TF
16 points

Basta ya de darle cancha a los antivacunas, por favor

Enrique TF
16 points
SHARE
TWEET
A six-year-old Utah boy underwent cosmetic surgery after bullies at his school teased him on the size of his ears. Gage Berger, a child in first grade, was often called "elf ears" by classmates—according to Berger's parents Tim and Kallie. Out of fear that being bullied at such a young age would hurt Berger's mental health in the long-term, his parents decided surgery was the best solution.

Parents get their six year old son plastic surgery after bullies tease him

But while most of us had to deal with bullies the "old fashioned way" (fight back or simply ignore it), Berger's parents feel like the operation was worth it to avoid life-long issues.

Speaking to The New York Daily News, plastic surgeon Dr. Tracy Pfeifer notes that it's "not unusual for a child to have ear surgery at a relatively young age." Steven J. Pearlman, MD, a facial plastic and reconstructive surgeon, said that the surgery was reasonable decision, pointing out that when children are bullied, "it's harder to make friends so they become socially stunted. They are also perceived as less intelligent by peers and even adults."

However, Child and Family Psychologist Dr. Karen Caraballo, finds the choice concerning. While she understands that bullying can have long-term psychological effects, there should be other steps taken before having a child go under the knife. These include ignoring the bullies, finding other activities for the child outside of school, and simply promoting a positive body image.

It's understandable that Berger's parents would want to help ease their child's schoolyard suffering, but this may be a touch too far.

Fuente: news.yahoo.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content