Man Spends 6 Months Making One $1,500 Sandwich "From Scratch"

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For most of us, the hardest part about making a sandwich involves hunting for mustard and pickles in the back of the fridge, but not Andy George.

Man Spends 6 Months Making One $1,500 Sandwich "From Scratch"

George, host of the TV and YouTube show How to Make Everything, took the task of sandwich-making a little more literally.

George spent six months and $1,500 making a single chicken sandwich, showing the Internet just how much we take for granted.

Despite the growing popularity of urban gardening and eating local, George points out in his video, “the average person has become less and less involved in the creation of their own food supply.”

Salt, for instance. Salt can be found on almost every table. But most people don’t consider that, for much of human history, salt was so precious it was considered a currency. In 6th century sub-Saharan Africa, merchants traded salt ounce for ounce for gold.

Now it’s just something we “pass.”

Not for Andy George, though. A resident of Minnesota, George traveled to the Pacific Ocean, sailed out to sea, gathered water, brought it home, boiled it for six hours, baked it, and then narrowly sneaked the suspicious looking ziplock bag past airport security on his way home.

His quest for a homemade sandwich led him on all sorts of adventures, including planting vegetables and wheat to make pickles and bread, gathering honey from honeybees when his sugar beets weren’t growing, picking stinging nettles to help him make cheese and, finally, butchering his own chicken.

The result? “It’s not bad,” he says, considering the result of his work. “That’s about it.”

Fuente: www.yahoo.com
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