The biggest health fear women have in their 60s

 
Related

Rule to force high school girls to undress next to naked boys who think they're girls

Virgnia T Sherl
8386 points

Edward the sloth is ready for his first Halloween

Virgnia T Sherl
668 points



Most recent

Voces de un oculto y maldito sueño: La vida es la que es, aunque sea deseable otra

Enrique TF
16 points

Las obedientes neuronas pensantes

Henri Monzó Catalá
20 points

5 colores de primavera ideales para redecorar tu hogar

MaríaGeek
40 points

¡Jé jé jé jééééé

¡Yo Voté NO!
26 points

En un planeta minúsculo

Enrique TF
12 points

Churro mediamanga y mangotero

Enrique TF
16 points

Periodista Andrea González-Villablanca finaliza sus estudios en la UNCTAD, Ginebra

ESNOTICIA.COM
18 points

LA LEYENDA DE SHAMIR

Logia Stgo. de Chile
14 points

Cómo dar un abrazo con el menor riesgo posible en plena pandemia del coronavirus

Henri Monzó Catalá
36 points

Consigue tus minicréditos aprobados en 10 minutos

Prestamos Rapidos
20 points
SHARE
TWEET
Health complaints change over the decades. What worries us at 25 is very different than our concerns at 40. We asked the HuffPost Lifestyle Facebook community to tell us what they worried about most and then conferred with experts. Here's what we learned. (Find them all here.)

The biggest health fear women have in their 60s

We asked: What is your biggest health worry?

You answered: "Living too long. As long as I am healthy and don't require ongoing medical care, I'm happy to be here. But as soon as I have to fully depend on others for my care, I'm out of here!"

The perks of being a 60-something
When we informally surveyed our readers about their health fears, we were pleasantly surprised with the positive outlook that many older women -- particularly those in their 60s -- had about their health.

And there's a lot to be thankful about once you've reached age 60. "There’s so much anxiety about reproductive health," said Dr. Cheryl Iglesia, who specializes in pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery at the MedStar Washington Hospital Center. "First, you’re in you teens and 20s trying to prevent [pregnancy], then you’re in your 30s and 40s not being able to get pregnant. It causes a lot of distress. After your 50s -- que sera, sera -- you’ve accepted it. Either you’ve had it or not, and you don’t have to worry about it anymore. It’s nice."

Preparing for what's to come
Our readers did express worry about aging, however, particularly over the prospect of losing independence and mobility in their twilight years, and becoming a burden on their loved ones should they no longer be able to take care of themselves.

In Iglesia's opinion, the best way to guard against fears about losing independence is to create an advanced directive: a legal document detailing end-of-life care decisions long before they actually need to be put in place. Iglesia -- whose own living will (created with her husband and an attorney) includes the couple's wishes regarding respirators, feeding tubes, long-term care insurance and power of attorney -- stressed the importance of creating a plan as soon as you have children, then updating it each decade thereafter.

"It’s so much easier on your family to have that plan in place," she said. "You never know when you are going to die."

Chronic pain and arthritis
Women in the United States are living longer than ever, with those who reach the 65-year benchmark expected to live until age 86 on average, two years longer than their male counter parts. Of course, day-to-day aches and pains, as well as more serious health conditions, tend to get worse as you age.

With age comes arthritis, the most common cause of disability, which affects 53 million adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's a health condition that can quickly snowball. If joint pain prevents women from getting enough physical activity, they run a greater risk of developing additional chronic conditions, like Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. And while it might seem counterintuitive, the primary antidote to arthritis pain is movement.

“People control their pain by doing less physical activity,” Dr. Jungwha Lee, a biostatistician at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, told the New York Times in April. “But being more active can delay the functional decline that accompanies aging. Any activity is better than being sedentary.”

Small lifestyle changes -- like parking farther away at the grocery store and making an effort to avoid sitting for long periods of time -- can make a big difference, as can maintaining a healthy body weight. Excess body weight puts stress on your joints, so muscle strengthening and healthy weight loss can go a long way toward delaying arthritis and staying mobile for years to come.

Beyond arthritis and end-of-life care the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists put together an informative checklist of screenings, immunizations and evaluations that are important for women in their 60s.

Fuente: www.huffingtonpost.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content