Engineers have increased fiber optic capacity nearly 20 times

31.58% credibility
 
Related

Japan s Cat Island Asks Internet For Food, Gets More Than They Can Store

Stuff
606 points

The schoolboy, 16, who will live with a Russian porn star in a hotel for a month

Stuff
3964 points



Most recent

Celebra un Magnifique Mother s Day con el Cacao Brunch de Sofitel Bogotá Victoria Regia

Negocios Hoy
6 points

Los ácidos grasos presentes en frutos secos pueden prevenir arritmias en infartos

NOTICIAS-ETF
118 points

Cinco planes de aventura y deportes para tu próxima visita a Santa Marta

Negocios Hoy
10 points

Las vacunas nasales para la covid que están cerca de llegar: podrían aportar más inmunidad que las

NOTICIAS-ETF
144 points

Ser feliz en cada tiempo

El diario de Enrique
6 points

Teléfonos ultra resistentes aliados eficientes en variedad de ambientes de trabajo

Comms1
38 points

Hay días que todo parece absurdo

El diario de Enrique
12 points

SEMBRATÓN EN LA RESERVA FORESTAL POPALES EN SEGOVIA

Image Press
4 points

Cuán duro, cuán amargo es llegar a ser hombre

El diario de Enrique
8 points

La verdad de lo imposiblemente perfecto

El diario de Enrique
8 points
SHARE
TWEET
With the amount of internet-connected devices increasing every day, the need for better, faster Internet is considerable. University researchers have come up with a very clever solution to this problem.

Engineers have increased fiber optic capacity nearly 20 times

Electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego have just broken the capacity limits of fiber optic cables nearly 20 times, successfully sending a signal through 7,456.45 miles of cable without needing electronic regenerators. This breakthrough could potentially increase the strength of the fiber optic cables that connect the world.

Current fiber optic tech only allows for a certain amount of strength before the signals through the cables distort, requiring the usage of expensive electronic regenerators to increase the signal clarity over a long distance. This distortion is called "crosstalk," and it adheres to a set of physical principles. In other words, this distortion isn't random, and thus, predictable.

The researchers at UC San Diego use what they're calling a "frequency comb" to predict those distortions and reverse them, creating a stronger signal without the need of regenerators. With the combs in place, the researchers were able to send a signal 20 times stronger than the previous limit without any signal degradation.

A Press Release from UC San Diego compared the usage of these frequency combs to an concertmaster tuning an orchestra before a concert: all of the instruments tune to a pitch given by the concertmaster, synchronizing the whole orchestra.

In fiber optic communications, information is sent across multiple channels, which operate at different frequencies. The frequency combs synchronize all of these channels, which is what allowed them to send clear data over 7,000 miles of cable.

This breakthrough comes shortly after there was some panic in the media about the internet reaching capacity because of the limitations in fiber optic capacity. Today's standard fiber optic cables won't be able to handle the ever increasing amount of internet-connected devices.

The rise of the Internet of Things on top of the huge amount of internet-connected devices in the world highlights the need for stronger internet. The researchers at UC San Diego have shown the world a promising solution to the problem of improving the existing fiber optic infrastructure.

Fuente: mashable.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content