Mystery of holes in Swiss cheese finally solved

53.33% credibility
 
Related

Scientists have discovered that you can eat as much chocolate as you want

Health
772 points

Intelligent people are more easily distracted at work, study claims

Health
534 points



Most recent

Enantyum o Ibuprofeno: ¿se puede sustituir uno por otro?

NOTICIAS-ETF
14 points

Covid ómicron: ¿me puedo volver a contagiar tras haberme recuperado? y otras 6 preguntas

NOTICIAS-ETF
8 points

TransMilenio lanza nueva versión de libro de datos de cómo se mueve Bogotá

Aiskel Alejandra
16 points

Fiebre y febrícula: diferencias, tipos y cómo tratarla

NOTICIAS-ETF
214 points

S2 Grupo amplía su equipo comercial en Colombia con la incorporación de Fernando Horacio

Prensa
12 points

Noches de calma

El diario de Enrique
8 points

La mejor etapa de nuestra vida: Estos son los beneficios emocionales de envejecer

NOTICIAS-ETF
8 points

¿Sabes quién soy?

El diario de Enrique
8 points

Un nuevo análisis de sangre detecta cáncer en personas con síntomas que suelen pasar desapercibidos

NOTICIAS-ETF
312 points

La estupidez humana, sin límites: Murió Cirsten Weldon, antivacunas y seguidora d QAnon, por covid19

NOTICIAS-ETF
8 points
SHARE
TWEET
he mystery of Swiss cheese and its disappearing holes has finally been solved.

Mystery of holes in Swiss cheese finally solved

A Swiss agricultural institute discovered that tiny specks of hay are responsible for the famous holes in cheeses like Emmental or Appenzell.

As milk matures into cheese these "microscopically small hay particles" help create the holes in the traditional Swiss cheese varieties.

The government-funded Agroscope institute said in a statement Thursday that the transition from age-old milking methods in barns to fully-automated, industrial milking systems had caused holes to decline during the last 15 years because the systems being used are cleaner.

In a series of tests, scientists added different amounts of hay dust to the milk and discovered it allowed them to regulate the number of holes.

Agroscope said in a statement that the fascination with the formations in the cheese stretches back to 1917 when a detailed review of Emmental was published by American William Clark. He contended they were produced because of carbon dioxide from bacteria.

Fuente: mashable.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!

Comentarios más recientes
Georgia Symon
I Got Hooked On Having An Online Business Almost A Decade Ago When I Created An Online Course And Made My First ......... WWW.TIMES-REPORT.COM
 
Featured content