Which One Of These Egg Yolks Looks The Most Normal To You?

 
Related

Netflix will pay you $2,000 week to travel and take instagram photos

Stories
590 points

You Could Soon Be Driving With Morgan Freeman

Stories
252 points



Most recent

Sigo queriendo ser un niño

El diario de Enrique
4 points

Dia Mundial contra el cáncer de mama

El diario de Enrique
108 points

Hoy es domingo ... ¿verdad?

El diario de Enrique
14 points

Una verdadera preciosidad

El diario de Enrique
22 points

Descubren cómo las células T destruyen las células cancerígenas mientras las buscan

NOTICIAS-ETF
186 points

12 de octubre de 1966

El diario de Enrique
12 points

Inventan un sistema para 'pescar' grandes cantidades de plástico marino

NOTICIAS-ETF
114 points

El peligro es evidente: Hallan tasas de microplásticos inesperadamente altas en las heces d bebés

NOTICIAS-ETF
214 points

Hombre sensato, hombre insensato

El diario de Enrique
8 points

4 razones para pasarse a la tendencia de auriculares inalámbricos

Actualidad
136 points
SHARE
TWEET
When you cracked that egg into the frying pan this morning, you probably saw a quivering yellow yolk surrounded by translucent whites. What you probably didn't know is that eggs yolks aren't actually supposed to be yellow.

Which One Of These Egg Yolks Looks The Most Normal To You?

The color of an egg yolk says a lot about the health of the chicken who laid it, and for most of our breakfasts, the diagnosis is less than ideal.

When we think of egg-laying chickens, most of us picture a free-roaming, peck-where-she-pleases hen like the one pictured above. However, most eggs come from chickens who spend 24 hours a day cooped up in a cage. They rarely see the sun, and almost never roam. Want to know if your chicken was a prisoner or a roamer? Just look at the yolk.

Which one of these yolks looks normal to you?

If you buy your eggs in an American grocery store, the lighter-yellow yolk in the middle probably looks the most normal. Organic, vegetarian-fed or cheap; most commercially available eggs in the US have a thin, yellow yolk. And that means the chicken probably wasn't eating a healthy diet.
Although it may look unusual, a thick yolk with dark orange coloring is actually the most desirable.

"Richer-colored egg yolks are more likely to come from free-range hens," says Dr. Hilary Shallo Thesmar, director of food safety programs for the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC): "Free-range hens have the opportunity to eat more pigmented foods, and the pigment is then transferred to the yolk."

So why care about what the hen was eating? Because it affects the nutritional value of the egg YOU'RE eating.

While macronutrients (protein and fat) remain the same regardless of yolk color, darker colored yolks indicate the presence of xanthophylls and omega-3 fatty acids in the hen's diet. Xanthophylls are found in dark leafy greens like spinach, kale and collards, as well as in zucchini, broccoli, and brussels sprouts. Omega-3 fatty acids are highly concentrated in flax seeds and sea kelp.

When these healthful nutrients are part of the hen's diet, the nutrients they are passed on to their eggs and concentrated in their yolks. And guess who eats those?! According to Mother Earth News, which conducted its own egg analysis, and a more recent Pennsylvania State University study, pastured eggs contain higher levels of vitamins A, D and E; more beta-carotene; and more omega-3s.

All this means is that a pastured egg is actually better for you, as well as the chicken who lays it. Find pastured eggs sold near you at LocalHarvest.org/pastured-eggs.jsp.



Fuente: distractify.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content