Norway's crown princess diagnosed with chronic lung disease

 
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Norwegian Crown Princess Mette-Marit announced Thursday that doctors diagnosed her with a rare, chronic lung disease.

Norway's crown princess diagnosed with chronic lung disease

The crown princess' doctor, Kristian Bjøro, diagnosed her with an unusual variant of fibrosis in her lungs, the Royal Family said.

"The crown princess will have to undergo further investigation in the future and also treatment trials. In such conditions as the crown princess has, it is common for us to cooperate with environments abroad," Bjøro said.

Mette-Marit, 45, said the condition will restrict her ability to perform royal duties as time goes on.

"Although such a diagnosis will limit my life at times, I'm glad that the disease has been discovered so early. My goal is still to work and participate in the official program as much as possible," she said.

Earlier this year, Mette-Marit said she had been experiencing vertigo.

"I turned my head quickly, and it was like the whole world began to move," she said.

Bjøro said Mette-Marit's lungs had been experiencing gradual change for several years, but the early diagnosis gave her a good prognosis.

"For a number of years, I have had health challenges on a regular basis, and now we know more about what these are," the crown princess said.

Fibrosis typically affects people 70 to 75 years old and Bjøro said Mette-Marit's diagnosis wasn't related to any environmental or lifestyle factor, like most cases.

Symptoms of the condition include shortness of breath, dry cough, fatigue, weight loss and loss of appetite, muscle or joint pain, and rounded or swollen finger-tips.

By Daniel Uria

Fuente: www.upi.com
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