Vaping may help some smokers quit, small study says

 
Related

Man who murdered over 70 serial killers, now walks free

You have to know
638 points

Here s why you should always wear socks when you go to bed

You have to know
312 points



Most recent

Una encuesta de Pure Storage revela un aumento en la adopción de la nube nativa para acelerar la ent

Patricia Amaya Comunicaciones
22 points

¿Cómo lograr entrevistas con Bilderberg, Putin y Trump? Los logros de Andrea González-Villablanca

Periodistas Lideres
14 points

Estreno de La última paciente, domingo 7 de julio 2024, Teatro Nuevo Versalles. 5:30 p.m

Benjamin Bernal
12 points

Fraudes financieros ascenderían en 2025 a cerca de USD400 millones en cada país de Latinonamérica

Prensa
8 points

En qué consiste el auto reiki y cuáles son sus beneficios

Saludables
20 points

Descubre cuál es la diferencia entre sublimación y serigrafía

MaríaGeek
8 points

Programa Accelerating Innovation dirigido a StartUps innovadoras en gestión de clientes

Tecnologia
12 points

La industria de motocicletas prioriza la seguridad con nuevas medidas a partir del 2025

Prensa
20 points

76% de las empresas aseguran su ciberseguridad, pero solo 1% logra cobertura total

Prensa
10 points

Catequesis Cristiana Católica Apostólica Romano-Tridentina

I'm Chester O'Brien
14 points
SHARE
TWEET
There's new research suggesting that a switch over to e-cigarettes can help cigarette smokers kick their habit -- even if initially they didn't intend to.

Vaping may help some smokers quit, small study says

The small British study of 40 people "found that vaping may support long-term smoking abstinence," lead researcher Dr. Caitlin Notley, of Norwich Medical School, at the University of East Anglia, said in a university news release.

Still, anti-smoking advocates in the United States stressed that vaping isn't without its own hazards.

First of all, prior research shows that ex-smokers who vape often return to tobacco cigarettes, said Dr. Len Horovitz, a lung specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

And, "while there are certainly more harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke, there is a question of safety in e-cigarettes because of the presence of propylene glycol, and other as yet unidentified compounds," Horovitz said.

In the new study, Notley's group asked 40 people who used e-cigarettes about their tobacco smoking history and prior attempts to quit smoking, and about their vaping habits. The investigation was funded by Cancer Research UK.

According to Notley, the study revealed that vaping provides smokers with "many of the physical, psychological, social and cultural elements of cigarette smoking." Beyond that, vapers described the activity as "pleasurable in its own right, as well as convenient and cheaper than smoking," she said.

"But the really interesting thing we found was that vaping may also encourage people who don't even want to stop smoking, to eventually quit," Notley said.

Most of the participants were long-time tobacco cigarette smokers and had tried to quit many times, but about 17 percent said they enjoyed smoking and had never seriously attempted to quit.

"These were our accidental quitters," Notley said. "They hadn't intended to quit smoking and had tried vaping on a whim, or because they had been offered it by friends. They went on to like it, and only then saw it as a potential substitute for smoking."

The findings suggest "that vaping is a viable long-term substitute for smoking, with substantial implications for tobacco harm reduction," according to Notley.

But another U.S.-based anti-smoking advocate agreed with Horovitz that smokers -- and everyone else -- should approach e-cigarettes with caution.

"With regard to their safety, though e-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer toxic chemicals than the smoke from regular cigarettes, there is still concern," said Andrea Spatarella, of the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y.

"The CDC also reports that adult e-cigarette users often do not stop smoking cigarettes completely, but continue to use both a vaping product and cigarettes," she noted. The bottom line, Spatarella said, is that "data analysis on the e-cigarette's utility for long-term smoking cessation remains a work-in-progress."

The study was published June 20 in Harm Reduction Journal.

Fuente: www.upi.com
SHARE
TWEET
To comment you must log in with your account or sign up!
Featured content